Discuss Debate Disseminate

When: 22nd June 2012, 09:00-12:30

Where: Upper Lounge, Reed Hall, Streatham Campus, Exeter

What: A discussion of the issues around the management of research materials and data and an opportunity to network with other researchers: PhD students and early career researchers from all disciplines welcome.

Blog: Laura Molloy, JISC MRD evidence gatherer, blogs on the event here.

Research Data Management Workshop for Professional Services Staff

When: 19th June 2012, 09:30-12:30

Where: LT6.1, Queen's Building, Streatham Campus, Exeter

What: A workshop with specialist input from the Digital Curation Centre to train Professional Services staff (Library, RKT, Exeter IT, College Staff) on what they need to know about research data management to assist researchers effectively.

Presentations and exercises: See the DCC website for the presentations and exercises from this event.

Blog: See our blog on this workshop.

Research Data Management Workshop for PhD Students

When: 18th June 2012, 13:30-16:30

Where: LT6.1, Queen's Building, Streatham Campus, Exeter

Why: Find out why research data management is important for your research with specialist staff from the Digital Curation Centre.

Presentations and exercises: See the DCC website for the presentations and exercises from this event.

Blog: See our blog on this workshop.

How to Write a Data Management Plan: A Short Guide

When: 23rd April 2012, 12:00-12:30

Where: Lecture Theatre 1, Peter Lanyon Building, Cornwall campus

What: A short presentation on how to write a data management plan followed by coffee and cakes. All PhD students and researchers are welcome.

Presentation: See the Tremough powerpoint slides (pdf document).

Open Exeter Presentation at Research Speed Updating

When: 18th July 2012, 14:00-14:45

Where: XFI Lecture Theatre, Streatham Campus, Exeter (videoconferenced to Tremough and St Luke's)

What: We will be presenting on "Research Data Management: Funders' Policies and Expectations" at Research Speed Updating.

Presentation: The presentation and audio are available here.

Policy Consultation Drop-in Session

When: 20th August 2012, 14:00-16:00

Where: XFI Seminar Room B, Streatham Campus, Exeter

What: If you have any queries/questions/comments about the UoE's draft Open Access and Research Data Management policies, come by and talk to us!

The policies are available online here.

Join this event on Facebook!

Open Access Week

When: Monday 22nd October to Friday 26th October 2012

Where: Streatham Campus, St Luke's Campus & Cornwall Campus

What: The University of Exeter celebrated Open Access Week with a variety of talks, debates and workshops on the Streatham, St Luke's and Cornwall Campuses.

Blog: Read our blog for information about the week and links to video of the talks and slides from the presentations.

Streatham Campus

 When Monday 22nd OctoberTuesday 23rd OctoberWednesday 24th October
  Where What Where What Where What
09:30 to 10:30 XFI Cafe Open Access Cafe  - Jess Gardner Building:One Kolade Open Access and the Research Excellence Framework  - Michael Wykes Amory A128 Managing Research Data - The Basics and the Benefits - Various
11:00 to 12:00 Building:One Constantin Leventis An Introduction to Open Access plus How do I use Symplectic to put my publications on Open Access? - Various Streatham Court 0.28 How to write a Data Management Plan - Gareth Cole Laver LT3 or from your own computer Managing Research Data for the Social Sciences - Webinar with the UKDA
12:00 to 13:00 Streatham Court 0.28 Disruptive Dissemination of Research Outputs  - figshare founder Mark Hahnel Newman Lecture Theatre B Open Practices for the Connected Researcher  - Brian Kelly Streatham Court C Open Access and you – a relationship with promise - Alma Swan 
14:00 to 15:00 Old Library 134 RCUK Open Access Policy  -  NERC's Mark Thorley Amory A128 Developing Open Access and Research Data Management Policy - Various XFI Lecture Theatre Research Speed Updating - Various
15:30 to 16:30 Queens LT4.2 Data Protection, Data Storage and Sharing  - Caroline Dominey Queens LT4.2 Open Access Surgery - Open Access Team Streatham Court C Realising the full potential of Open Access: How I learnt to stop worrying and love the RCUK policy - Cameron Neylon
16:30         XFI Cafe Open Access Happy Hour!

 St Luke's Campus

WhenThursday 25th October
  Where What
09:30 to 10:30 Baring Court 112 What is Open Access? What is research data management? Principles, Policy and Practicalities - Open Access Team
11:00 to 12:00 Baring Court 112 Open Access - How do I use Symplectic to put my publications on Open Access - Various
12:00 to 13:00 Baring Court 112 Can Open Science be a Space for Public Engagement with Science? - Ann Grand
14:00 to 15:00 Baring Court 112 Wellcome Trust: Open Access Policy - Margaret Hurley
15:30 to 16:30 Baring Court 112 Going for Gold: Gold Open Access publishing - BioMed Central

 Cornwall Campus

WhenFriday 26th October
  Where What
11:30 to 12:30 Peter Lanyon Building Seminar Room 5 Open Access - How do I use Symplectic to put my publications on Open Access  - Various
13:30 to 14:30 Peter Lanyon Building Lecture Theatre 2 What is Open Access? What is research data management? Principles, Policy and Practicalities - Open Access Team
14:30 to 15:30 Peter Lanyon Building Lecture Theatre 2 Open Access Happy Hour

The Lineup

Cameron Neylon

Cameron Neylon is a biophysicist who has always worked in interdisciplinary areas and is an advocate of open research practice and improved data management.

He currently works as Advocacy Director at the Public Library of Science.

Along with his work in structural biology and biophysics his research and writing focuses on the interface of web technology with science and the successful (and unsuccessful) application of generic and specially designed tools in the academic research environment.

He is a co-author of the Panton Principles for Open Data in Science and writes regularly on the social, technical, and policy issues of open research at his blog, Science in the Open.

Specialist Subject

Realising the full potential of Open Access: How I learnt to stop worrying and love the RCUK policy.

The web changes everything, and yet it has changed our central means of scholarly communication, the peer reviewed journal article, only slightly. At the same time we have a growing number of examples showing the potential for research to be transformed when the web is fully exploited to both carry out and communicate research. This transformation will both radically enhance our research capacity while simultaneously drive down the costs and increase the efficiency of research communication. There will be transitional costs and a period of instability but for those institutions taking a leadership position there is a significant potential to both unlock the potential savings early and reap the strategic benefits of being ahead of the pack. While by no means perfect, the RCUK policy on open access represents a bold step in positioning UK research at the leading edge of the change that is coming. UK institutions have a historic opportunity to take a global leadership position on next generation scholarly communication if they are able to engage productively with the policy and work in concert to manage the transitional costs.

Alma Swan

Alma Swan is a consultant working in the field of scholarly communication. She is a director of Key Perspectives Ltd and Director of European Advocacy Programmes for SPARC and Convenor for Enabling Open Scholarship, the organisation of universities promoting the principles of open scholarship in the academic community. She holds honorary academic positions in the University of Southampton School of Electronics & Computer Science and the University of Warwick Business School.

Her work covers market research and business modelling, project management and evaluation, research communication practices and behaviours, and the study and promotion of new forms of scholarly communication in the age of the Web. She writes and makes frequent presentations on scholarly communication issues.

Alma has BSc and PhD degrees from the University of Southampton and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She is a Fellow of the Society of Biology (UK) and a Chartered Biologist, and has just completed three terms as an elected member of the Governing Board of Euroscience (the European Association for the Promotion of Science & Technology) and is the former editor of its online magazine, The Euroscientist.

Specialist Subject

Open Access and you – a relationship with promise.

Be online or be invisible – so far, so sensible. But there’s online and online. It’s worth picking this issue apart, because some kinds of online presence are not nearly so effective as others. I will describe some of the things that are happening in research communication, and why we think it won’t stop there. The web offers huge opportunities to do things better, more systematically, more effectively, more cheaply. I will give an overview of the opportunities for researchers and the benefits that accrue from taking those opportunities.

Mark Hahnel

Mark is the founder of figshare, an open data tool that allows researchers to publish all of their data in a citable, searchable and sharable manner. He’s fresh out of of academia, having just completed his PhD in stem cell biology at Imperial College London, having previously studied genetics in both Newcastle and Leeds. He is passionate about open science and the potential it has to revolutionise the research community. For more information about figshare, visit http://figshare.com. You can follow him at @figshare.

Specialist Subject

Disruptive dissemination of research outputs.

figshare is a repository where users can make all of their research outputs available in a citable, sharable and discoverable manner. figshare allows users to upload any file format to be visualisable in the browser so that figures, datasets and media can be disseminated in a way that the current scholarly publishing model does not allow. In a research environment, under the current operating system, most data and figures collected or generated during your work is lost, intentionally tossed aside or classified as “junk”, or at worst trapped in silos or locked behind embargo periods. This stifles and limits scientific research at its core, making it much more difficult to validate experiments, reproduce experiments or even stumble upon new breakthroughs that may be buried in your null results.

The dissemination of research data is something that has been done in a well-defined manner for 300 years. With the advent of the internet, many established distribution models have been redefined and improved on. The outputs of academic research are evolving and much of it is becoming digitized and growing in size. There are many good example of how web platforms that efficiently distribute digital content, such as YouTube and itunes. In this presentation, we will explain how figshare is following their lead in an effort to disrupt one of the last remaining content distributing systems to be revolutionized by the internet, and how open access makes all of this possible.

Brian Kelly

Brian works for the JISC-funded Innovation Support Centre at UKOLN, a national centre of expertise in digital information management, based at the University of Bath.

Specialist Subject

The potential benefits of open access to research papers is well-understood. However social media provides opportunities for 'connected researchers' to both engage more effectively with their peers and raise the visibility of their research outputs which can help in enhancing citations of their papers and implementation of the ideas.

In this talk Brian Kelly will describe how he has used social media communication tools such as his UK Web Focus blog, his Twitter account and his Facebook profile and social media sharing tools such as Slideshare to develop successful research collaborations (which resulted in one encounter on Twitter leading to an award-winning paper!) and his papers being the most-downloaded from the University of Bath repository.

As part of his commitment to open practices in the support of his professional activities Brian will outlines his recommendations for ways in which researchers can exploit the opportunities presented by the social web.

Ann Grand

Ann has recently completed PhD research in Open Science and Public Engagement, looking at ways in which the emerging ideas and practice of open science can be a medium for public access to and involvement in the process of science and an innovative method for real-time science communication. Using a mixture of interviews, case studies and online surveys, her research focussed on open science’s potential to support public engagement and on new media use in communicative processes.

Specialist Subject

Ann's occasional musings on open science and related topics can be found on her blog. Ann started her working life as a biology teacher and although she left teaching after ten years, continued to be passionate about communicating the excitement and exhilaration of science. Between 1983 and 1989, Ann took an Open University degree, following a range of science units. In 2003, she founded Bristol Science Cafe. She is also a freelance editor (mainly science books).

Mark Thorley

Mark is Head of Science Information and Data Management Co-ordinator for the UK’s Natural Environment Research Council  - NERC. He is responsible for activities relating to scientific data and information management, including the management of the NERC Research Library Service, and for co-ordinating the activities of NERC’s network of environmental data centres. He is also chair of Research Councils UK – Research Outputs Network, which leads for RCUK on issues relating to scholarly communications and open access.

Specialist Subject

Mark will talk about the new RCUK Open Access policy which will come into effect from 1st April 2013.

Margaret Hurley

The Wellcome Trust supports unrestricted access to the published outputs of research through their open access policy. It is a fundamental part of the Trust’s charitable mission to ensure that the work it funds can be read and utilised by the widest possible audience. On the 28th June 2012 the Trust announced that it will be strengthening the manner in which it enforces its open access policy and that from early 2013, the Trust will also require that when it pays an open access fee, a paper is made freely available for all types of re-use (including commercial uses) subject to appropriate acknowledgement.

Specialist Subject

Margaret Hurley is the contact for researchers with Open Access queries about their Wellcome Trust grant and will talk today about the Trust’s Open Access policy.

Alejandro Lopez Cobos

The last twelve years has seen great changes in the marketplace and perception of open access publishing. Gold Open Access publishing is in the news globally now especially with the recent endorsement of the Finch report and the funding announcement from RCUK. There are also developments abroad with the EU 2020 project and the White House investigations into public access to research.

Specialist Subject

Alejandro Lopez Cobos, BioMed Central's Southern Europe, Middle East and Latin America Sales Executive, will cover these developments in detail together with outlining the benefits to authors of publishing in Gold Open Access Journals.

Competition - Win a Kindle

Come up with the best name for the new Open Access repository and you could win a Kindle.

ERIC - the current repository for research papers - and EDA - the pilot repository for research data - are becoming one. It will then be possible to link publications to the research behind them. The best suggested name of the merged repository will win a Kindle.

You can enter the competition in two ways:

  1. Pick up a competition postcard, fill it out and post in the black postbox by our Open Access stall on the mezzanine level of the forum
  2. Submit your suggestion via email to openaccess@exeter.ac.uk

Feedback

Please submit your feedback on the Open Access Week events either by picking up a post card from the stall on the Mezzanine Floor of the Forum or completing the online survey.

Open Research Exeter (ORE) Launch

The Open Exeter project is very pleased to announce the launch of Open Research Exeter (ORE)! 

ORE is an open repository for Exeter researchers which increases the visibility, and facilitates the discovery, of all types of Exeter research - research papers, e-theses and completed research data can be accessed via the ORE interface.

The Open Exeter team will be in the Forum Street on Friday March 22nd from 10:00 – 12:00, to answer questions about the project and any other RDM and Open Access queries you may have. You will have the chance to see an ORE demo, and talk to those who developed the repository as well as other staff who support research at Exeter, including staff from RKT, Exeter IT and the Library.

For further information contact openaccess@exeter.ac.uk or rdm@exeter.ac.uk

Join the event on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/257114297758072/

Researcher Development Programme

Open Exeter ran a series of courses as part of the Researcher Development Programme for doctoral and post-doctoral researchers:


Starting Blocks

1. An introduction to research materials management – Thursday 22 November

Time and Data Management

2. Sharing data:  How, when, what? -  Tuesday 4 December

3. How to organise your files -  Tuesday 5 February

4. How to store and back-up your data securely -  Tuesday 12 March

5. What to Keep/Delete: How to appraise your data – Thursday 11 April

Communication and Sustaining your Research

6. Open Access and Institutional Repositories – Wednesday 5 June

Beyond the PhD

7. How to Write a Data Management Plan – Monday 17 June

 

When: 12.30 – 13.30.

Where: Professional Development Suite, Old Library, Streatham Campus, Exeter

Please register for these sessions via the Researcher Development Programme page.

Researcher Development Programme

Open Exeter ran a series of courses as part of the Researcher Development Programme for doctoral and post-doctoral researchers:


Starting Blocks

1. An introduction to research materials management – Thursday 22 November

Time and Data Management

2. Sharing data:  How, when, what? -  Tuesday 4 December

3. How to organise your files -  Tuesday 5 February

4. How to store and back-up your data securely -  Tuesday 12 March

5. What to Keep/Delete: How to appraise your data – Thursday 11 April

Communication and Sustaining your Research

6. Open Access and Institutional Repositories – Wednesday 5 June

Beyond the PhD

7. How to Write a Data Management Plan – Monday 17 June

 

When: 12.30 – 13.30.

Where: Professional Development Suite, Old Library, Streatham Campus, Exeter

Please register for these sessions via the Researcher Development Programme page.